Saturday, September 8, 2012

Google celebrates the 46th birthday of ‘Star Trek’ with interactive doodle

The Google doodle celebrating the 46th “Star Trek” features the letters of the site’s name as characters in the iconic show.

Fascinating… Google boldly goes where no search engine has gone before.

Google is celebrating the 46th anniversary of "Star Trek" with a new doodle that's so fun it might even make a Vulcan smile.

The first episode of the landmark television series, "The Man Trap," aired on Sept. 8, 1966. The doodle appeared a day ahead of schedule to give Trekkies, or Trekkers — depending on your perspective — some extra time to obsess.

Although our neural pathways have become accustomed to Google's doodle patterns, nothing has prepared us for this.

The interactive animation tells a multi-scene storyline with the letters from the Google logo playing the crew of the starship Enterprise. Captain James T. Kirk, for instance, appears as the central "o" in Google. The animation features references to classic episodes that hardcore fans will enjoy.

Ryan Germick, a self-professed fan himself, created the doodle with a team of artists. He was "really psyched" when he got the opportunity but also a little intimidated.

"You might have heard Trekkies are pretty hardcore," he said on the official "Star Trek" site.


 Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock and William Shatner as Captain James T. Kirk appear in “The Man Trap,” the premiere episode of “Star Trek,” which has been turned into a Google doodle to honor the show’s 46th anniversary. The show broke new ground and remains “light years” ahead in its vision of the future.

Google, though, is a technological service that is well-suited to honor the franchise. For years the search engine has helped people navigate the internet: the true final frontier.

The influential science-fiction program still inspires Germick and fellow Google employees to innovate and think of new possibilities.

"We often talk at Google about how awesome it would be to talk to a computer and get exactly what you want and have that kind of engagement, where the computer just knows all [like in "Star Trek"], and that's what we're moving toward," Germick told Entertainment Weekly.

"Star Trek" did more than entertain future technologists. The show was light-years ahead of its time, featuring a multi-ethnic cast working together with female doctors and scientists. The show's creator, Gene Roddenberry, also introduced a Russian crewmember during the cold war — depicting a positive future of humanity at a time of international tensions.

Fans have adored "Star Trek" for 46 years for being progressive and fun.

So head over the and, as Captain Jean-Luc Picard — from "Star Trek: The Next Generation" — says, “Engage!” 


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